Phoenix Stone Mosaic

Phoenix Stone Mosaic

Phoenix Stone Mosaic

“Life Drawing: Phoenix Rising” is a 9.5 feet by 17.5 feet natural stone mosaic. It was completed in late October after four long, long days. It is installed at Richard Bowling Elementary School in Norfolk, Virginia. The mosaic is located in the main hallway of the school, near the entrance to the cafeteria and the gym and not far from the main office. It is part of a series of mosaics we are making as part of a public art project for the city of Norfolk. I have so much appreciation and respect for my crew whose commitment and craftsmanship made this possible. Thanks be to Fred Lashley, Jonathan Frederick and Tony Costa.

Click here for other mosaics in this series. Enjoy the details of this piece in the photos below.

phoenix stone mosaic

Phoenix Stone Mosaic

 

Sacred Circle Fire Pit: Google Maps View

Hammerhead completed the Sacred Circle Fire Pit in January of 2014 for clients hoping to use the space for ceremonial gatherings. The photo below is of the fire pit after completion from down here on solid ground.

And here is a photo of the completed fire pit from Google Maps from up above.

This is the Google Maps photo from before the project was completed. Note the 7 small squares below the site. Those are pallets of stone we brought down to build with.

And back on the ground.

Phoenix Stone Mosaic: Coming Soon!

This phoenix stone mosaic is in progress as part of a public art installation in public schools in Norfolk, VA. The Hammerhead crew leaves this week to install it there.

The Phoenix Head

phoenix stone mosaic

The original concept for this artwork was a Great Blue Phoenix. Equally inspired by the rugged beauty of the great blue heron and the strength and persistent lives of the mythical Phoenix, the color theme was to be blue and gray. But I ran into a problem finding blue stone! Always expensive, there are very few types of truly blue stone that are made into tiles and sold in the United States. So I had to pivot…
Now the Phoenix is just a Phoenix. I think you can see the hint of the heron in this image of the Phoenix’s head.

The Workshop

phoenix stone mosaic

This table is my happy place. I have spent many hours here cutting templates and tracing patterns on to stone. Sometimes it’s hard to find a place to work because there’s so many tile choices on the table. A large map of the whole mosaic hangs over the table and is a useful reference. Hanging over the map is the phoenix tail, awaiting stone choices and cutting.

Design Reversal

phoenix stone mosaic

After we finished cutting the piece, we started laying it out. In a manner common to mosaics, we are laying it face down. Once we have established that we like the fits between stones, we are going to glue it to the paper. Then, we’re going to epoxy mesh to the back. Instead of 500 individual stones, we will have approximately 20 panels of stone to install.

Phoenix Detail

phoenix stone mosaic

By the nature of this process, we have never seen the completed mosaic all together in one place. I guess I can see how that would be a liability, but I prefer to think of it as a opportunity. It will be exciting to see it on the wall, for the first time, with the kids who it is for. It will be a surprise for all of us!

Phoenix Stone Mosaic: Feathers

phoenix stone mosaic

We have been calling these shapes scallops. They are a main element of the wing design. I made no effort to arrange the colors, preferring to let randomness take its course.

See some completed stone mosaics in this series in Norfolk, VA here and here.

Natural Stone Mosaic Yellow Wakerobin

Natural Stone Mosaic Yellow Wakerobin

natural stone mosaic yellow

Mosaic Commission

Natural Stone Mosaic Yellow Wakerobin was commissioned as a Mother’s Day gift for a family in Maryville, Tennessee. Named after the species of trillium featured on the piece, it now resides in a niche on a brick fireplace. A conversation with the Mom to be celebrated inspired the design. A heart survivor, she loves the mountains and is devoted to her three kids. The heart shaped leaves of the trillium, which grows wild in these mountains, seemed like a perfect match. And the white dove very much fits the family’s values and aspirations.

natural stone mosaic yellow

Dove and Trillium detail

Mosaic Design

I tried a new technique when I was creating the Trillium Mosaic. Once all the pieces were cut, I flipped them over and placed them on a reversed template. Since I take all of my pencil sketches into a digital space to create my patterns, it’s very easy to reverse the design and have it printed as a mirror image. Working backwards or upside down like this is a very common technique for mosaic artists, but it was the first time that I’d ever tried it.

One immediate advantage is that you can see how well the pieces are actually cut and make quick adjustments. Once I had the fits as I liked them, I applied fiberglass mesh. I used a special epoxy that I trust with stone to adhere the mesh. In the picture you can see tons of little scraps resting on the fiberglass as it sets up. Many mosaic artists will take the piece in that form and bring it for installation. I felt like my pieces of stone were too heavy for that, so I applied it to the backer board right there on the table. The fiberglass mesh was to prevent the stones from moving while I set it.

Mosaic Fabrication

Piecing together the dove

The images below show the two color options for the petals of the trillium. I sent these photos to the customer and they made the call between purple or yellow.

Whoops! I mixed my thinset too wet and then got impatient. As a result some of it used through the joints (pictured below). When I flipped it over, it was well adhered but still green, so I was able to scrape the excess mortar out. It was my penance for impatience.

The mosaic with mortar

natural stone mosaic yellow

All grouted – the dove’s eye is a tiny black stone marble.

Yellow Wakerobin detail

Mosaic Installation

natural stone mosaic yellow

 

Check out some other natural stone mosaics completed by Hammerhead Stoneworks:

Birds of Every Feather

Praying Mantis

The Boy with Antlers

Birds of Every Feather

Natural Stone Mosaic Birds of Every Feather: Fabrication Process

natural stone mosaic birds

Natural stone mosaic completed for Ocean View Elementary School in Norfolk, Virginia.

This collection of images is from the fabrication process of natural stone mosaic Birds of Every Feather, which was designed for Ocean View Elementary School in Norfolk, VA. It is the first in a series of six mosaics I will make for schools in this area as part of a public art commission.

natural stone mosaic birds

American goldfinch, white-breasted nuthatch, American robin

natural stone mosaic birds

American robin, red-bellied woodpecker, mourning dove

As with all of my mosaic work, I fabricated this at my shop before bringing it to the installation site. Making the birds was so much fun! The background, not so much. The eyes of the birds are either glass marbles or small pebbles. In order to save epoxy, I would do several eyes all at once, leading to this weird-looking photograph.

natural stone mosaic birds

The little brown bird is the Carolina wren. While building this at the shop, a Carolina wren built a nest on one of the shop’s storage shelves.

Read more about Birds of Every Feather here and here.

Thimbleweed Stone Mosaic

Thimbleweed Stone Mosaic

Thimbleweed Stone Mosaic

This thimbleweed stone mosaic is a small part of a very large mosaic that I’m currently building for the Southside STEM Academy at Campostella in Norfolk, VA. It’s part of a public art project that entails designing and installing six natural stone mosaics in various elementary schools there over the course of the next couple of years.

The thimbleweed (Anemone virginiana) is a native flower to Virginia. The mosaic was crafted using white marble, green marble, scabos travertine (yellow inner), and ocean pebbles.

Praying Mantis Stone Mosaic

Praying Mantis Stone Mosaic

Praying Mantis Stone Mosaic

This praying mantis stone mosaic is a small part of a very large mosaic that I’m currently building for the Southside STEM Academy at Campostella in Norfolk, VA. It’s part of a public art project that entails designing and installing six natural stone mosaics in various elementary schools there over the course of the next couple of years.

The eyes of the praying mantis are a fossilized coral called Petoskey stone, while the mantis itself is primarily a native North Carolina stone. Each of these pieces is about 34″ in diameter.

 

Speckled Crab Claw Mosaic

Speckled Crab Claw Stone MosaicCrab Claw Stone Mosaic

This speckled crab claw stone mosaic is a small part of a very large mosaic that I’m currently building for the Southside STEM Academy at Campostella in Norfolk, VA. It’s part of a public art project that entails designing and installing six natural stone mosaics in various elementary schools there over the course of the next couple of years.

The claw itself is made mostly of various marbles from Tennessee.

Hammerhead Stoneworks Featured in Asheville Lifestyle Magazine

Following up Hammerhead’s recent feature in the Slippery Rock Gazette, Asheville Lifestyle magazine’s September 2016 issue features our Green Man mosaic as well as other projects. We completed the Green Man Mosaic for Green Man Brewing in downtown Asheville, NC. The mosaic greets brewery visitors immediately upon entry to the building.

The full size mosaic in the space as featured in Asheville Lifestyle magazine

The full size mosaic in the space as featured in Asheville Lifestyle magazine 2016 David Dietrich

The article describes in detail the process of designing and creating the Green Man mosaic. It covers Marc’s attention to detail and quality, it elaborates on the local materials used for the project, and it gives an introduction to the full Hammerhead crew. The feature also includes a glimpse into one of Marc’s personal pieces entitled The Boy With Antlers (pictured below).

"The Boy With Antlers" is a natural stone mosaic.

“The Boy With Antlers” is a natural stone mosaic

Read the full feature in Asheville Lifestyle magazine here.

 

In the mosaic workspace

In the mosaic workspace

 

Contributors to the Asheville Lifestyle Magazine Feature

We would like to extend our gratitude to Tom Rogers for authoring this piece as well as to David Dietrich, Emily Glaser, and Kristin Cozzolino for their photo contributions.