Natural Stone Mosaic Yellow Wakerobin

Natural Stone Mosaic Yellow Wakerobin

natural stone mosaic yellow

Mosaic Commission

Natural Stone Mosaic Yellow Wakerobin was commissioned as a Mother’s Day gift for a family in Maryville, Tennessee. Named after the species of trillium featured on the piece, it now resides in a niche on a brick fireplace. A conversation with the Mom to be celebrated inspired the design. A heart survivor, she loves the mountains and is devoted to her three kids. The heart shaped leaves of the trillium, which grows wild in these mountains, seemed like a perfect match. And the white dove very much fits the family’s values and aspirations.

natural stone mosaic yellow

Dove and Trillium detail

Mosaic Design

I tried a new technique when I was creating the Trillium Mosaic. Once all the pieces were cut, I flipped them over and placed them on a reversed template. Since I take all of my pencil sketches into a digital space to create my patterns, it’s very easy to reverse the design and have it printed as a mirror image. Working backwards or upside down like this is a very common technique for mosaic artists, but it was the first time that I’d ever tried it.

One immediate advantage is that you can see how well the pieces are actually cut and make quick adjustments. Once I had the fits as I liked them, I applied fiberglass mesh. I used a special epoxy that I trust with stone to adhere the mesh. In the picture you can see tons of little scraps resting on the fiberglass as it sets up. Many mosaic artists will take the piece in that form and bring it for installation. I felt like my pieces of stone were too heavy for that, so I applied it to the backer board right there on the table. The fiberglass mesh was to prevent the stones from moving while I set it.

Mosaic Fabrication

Piecing together the dove

The images below show the two color options for the petals of the trillium. I sent these photos to the customer and they made the call between purple or yellow.

Whoops! I mixed my thinset too wet and then got impatient. As a result some of it used through the joints (pictured below). When I flipped it over, it was well adhered but still green, so I was able to scrape the excess mortar out. It was my penance for impatience.

The mosaic with mortar

natural stone mosaic yellow

All grouted – the dove’s eye is a tiny black stone marble.

Yellow Wakerobin detail

Mosaic Installation

natural stone mosaic yellow

 

Check out some other natural stone mosaics completed by Hammerhead Stoneworks:

Birds of Every Feather

Praying Mantis

The Boy with Antlers

Birds of Every Feather

Natural Stone Mosaic Birds of Every Feather: Fabrication Process

natural stone mosaic birds

Natural stone mosaic completed for Ocean View Elementary School in Norfolk, Virginia.

This collection of images is from the fabrication process of natural stone mosaic Birds of Every Feather, which was designed for Ocean View Elementary School in Norfolk, VA. It is the first in a series of six mosaics I will make for schools in this area as part of a public art commission.

natural stone mosaic birds

American goldfinch, white-breasted nuthatch, American robin

natural stone mosaic birds

American robin, red-bellied woodpecker, mourning dove

As with all of my mosaic work, I fabricated this at my shop before bringing it to the installation site. Making the birds was so much fun! The background, not so much. The eyes of the birds are either glass marbles or small pebbles. In order to save epoxy, I would do several eyes all at once, leading to this weird-looking photograph.

natural stone mosaic birds

The little brown bird is the Carolina wren. While building this at the shop, a Carolina wren built a nest on one of the shop’s storage shelves.

Read more about Birds of Every Feather here and here.

Thimbleweed Stone Mosaic

Thimbleweed Stone Mosaic

Thimbleweed Stone Mosaic

This thimbleweed stone mosaic is a small part of a very large mosaic that I’m currently building for the Southside STEM Academy at Campostella in Norfolk, VA. It’s part of a public art project that entails designing and installing six natural stone mosaics in various elementary schools there over the course of the next couple of years.

The thimbleweed (Anemone virginiana) is a native flower to Virginia. The mosaic was crafted using white marble, green marble, scabos travertine (yellow inner), and ocean pebbles.

Praying Mantis Stone Mosaic

Praying Mantis Stone Mosaic

Praying Mantis Stone Mosaic

This praying mantis stone mosaic is a small part of a very large mosaic that I’m currently building for the Southside STEM Academy at Campostella in Norfolk, VA. It’s part of a public art project that entails designing and installing six natural stone mosaics in various elementary schools there over the course of the next couple of years.

The eyes of the praying mantis are a fossilized coral called Petoskey stone, while the mantis itself is primarily a native North Carolina stone. Each of these pieces is about 34″ in diameter.

 

Speckled Crab Claw Mosaic

Speckled Crab Claw Stone MosaicCrab Claw Stone Mosaic

This speckled crab claw stone mosaic is a small part of a very large mosaic that I’m currently building for the Southside STEM Academy at Campostella in Norfolk, VA. It’s part of a public art project that entails designing and installing six natural stone mosaics in various elementary schools there over the course of the next couple of years.

The claw itself is made mostly of various marbles from Tennessee.

Sand Dollar Mosaic

Sand Dollar Mosaicsand dollar mosaic

This sand dollar mosaic is a small part of a very large mosaic that I’m currently building for the Southside STEM Academy at Campostella in Norfolk, VA. It’s part of a public art project that entails designing and installing six natural stone mosaics in various elementary schools there over the course of the next couple of years.

sand dollar mosaic

This mosaic is made exclusively of Quaker Gray marble from Tennessee Marble Company. Since I used only only one type of stone, I tried to explore texture and profile. The radiating arms of the star design all rise above the plane of the mosaic. This will will be installed at ground level and will encourage kids to touch and interact with the mosaic.

Cicada Mosaic

Cicada MosaicCicada Mosaic

This cicada mosaic is a small part of a very large mosaic that I’m currently building for the Southside STEM Academy at Campostella in Norfolk, VA. It’s part of a public art project that entails designing and installing six natural stone mosaics in various elementary schools there over the course of the next couple of years.

The cicada mosaic is about 33 inches across and will be one of seven circular panels surrounding two kids who are exploring nature with magnifying glasses and sketchbooks. When completed, the mosaic will be applied to a wall in the main hallway just inside the front entrance to the school. The entire mosaic including the cicada panel is called The Tiny Kingdom.

The Boy With Antlers

The Boy With Antlers
The Boy With Antlers

My mosaic entitled “The Boy With Antlers” was recently selected for a the North Carolina Artists Exhibition Opening sponsored by the Raleigh Fine Arts Society. This show specifically showcases artists from all over North Carolina. The piece is 24″ X 36″ and weighs about 55 lbs.

It will be on display at the Betty Ray McCain Gallery at the Duke Center for Performing Arts from March 4, 2018 until April 22, 2018. The juror’s lecture and awards take place on March 8 from 4:00 – 5:00 and will be followed by a wine reception and art sale from 5:00 until 6:30.

Read more about “The Boy With Antlers” as well as other original mosaic art here.

Great Blue Heron Garden Guardian

Great Blue Heron Garden Guardian

The Great Blue Heron Garden Guardian is now installed. The body is made of blue Bahia tile, while the bill is yellow travertine. The legs are made of a marble from Tennessee. The heron is inlayed into a piece of scrap stone from a former project. Read about the stone inlay process of this piece here.

Great Blue Heron Garden Guardian

Garden Guardian in Place

Great Blue Heron Garden Guardian

Prepping for Installation – Photo Credit: Jonathan Frederick

The Great Blue Heron is one of a few Garden Guardian projects we have designed and installed. Explore some of our other Garden Guardian projects here.
Call Marc at (828) 337-7582 or email him to have your own Garden Guardian commissioned.

Stone Inlay Process

Stone Inlay Process – Great Blue Heron

I’ve had this piece of stone at the shop for over a year. It was cut from a bench we installed in the Memorial Garden of First Baptist Church Asheville. I really liked the color and surface texture and was waiting for a project to suggest itself – and along came this blue heron stone inlay. I envisioned it becoming a Garden Guardian like Coyote, a piece we recently designed and installed in Atlanta.

Stone Inlay Process

The drawn pattern of the stone inlay

Soapstone is used to create the lines of the general shape, while a Sharpie is used for the exact contour. (Soapstone blows off when the grinder hits the rock, but the Sharpie stays in place.)

The Cutaway

The heron is a challenging shape. The point of the beak as well as the curve of the neck were both difficult to get just right, so I used pretty much every tool at my disposal. In order to use a small radius blade, I even got a little Dremel tile saw, which was a bit helpful, but overall lacked the needed power. I used a hammer and a very sharp lettering chisel to get the points as crisp as possible.

Stone inlay process

The stone cutaway

The Rubbing

Once the design is cut into the stone, I do a rubbing of sorts to get the contours on paper. I can remember doing this with my mom as a kid in the historic cemeteries of Rhode Island where I’m from. While never as exact as I want it to be, it’s usually pretty close. I drop my shapes onto this and then cut them out.

Stone Inlay Process

The shape rubbed on paper

Design Pattern

As you can see from the countless scribbles, I go through a lot of ideas. (And that’s after having drawn to design before I even started.) What looks good on paper and a small scale might not work in large scale. Due to the complex design of this project, after I cut it I had to reassemble it so I could figure out how the pieces fit together.

Stone Inlay Process

The drawn pattern. Note: nails only there to keep it from blowing away

Starting the Inlay

I knew I wanted the body and wings to be blue Bahia. This is a super expensive tile, but the color is astounding!

Stone Inlay Process

Starting the inlay with blue Bahia tile

The Heron’s Gray Neck

I think the scientist in me got a little too interested in biological accuracy. A great blue heron’s is more gray than blue, and I wanted to reflect that in the inlay. (And yes, I understand that even their wings aren’t that blue!) I switched from the blue Bahia tile to a gray stone for the neck. While I like the gray stone, I didn’t really like the effect.

Stone Inlay Process

The heron’s gray neck

The Finished Product

This is a little more like it. The body, neck, and head are all blue, while the beak is a particularly yellow type of travertine. The crest is black, and the legs are a marble from Tennessee.

Stone inlay process

The finished product

I had to cut the legs twice as the first ones were so snugly fit that a few grains of sand made a wedge between the legs and the stone, making it impossible to get them out without breaking them. I ended up cutting several of the stone of this finished stone inlay more than once.