Birds of Every Feather Mosaic in the newspaper!

natural stone bird mosaic

Natural stone mosaic completed for Ocean View Elementary School in Norfolk, Virginia.

In mid July, Jonathan and I traveled to Norfolk, Virginia to install the first of the mosaics I’m designing for public schools there. This one was installed on Ocean View Elementary School and features a diverse array of local birds. The area newspaper, the Virginian-Pilot, just ran a story about it.

Thimbleweed Stone Mosaic

Thimbleweed Stone Mosaic

Thimbleweed Stone Mosaic

This thimbleweed stone mosaic is a small part of a very large mosaic that I’m currently building for the Southside STEM Academy at Campostella in Norfolk, VA. It’s part of a public art project that entails designing and installing six natural stone mosaics in various elementary schools there over the course of the next couple of years.

The thimbleweed (Anemone virginiana) is a native flower to Virginia. The mosaic was crafted using white marble, green marble, scabos travertine (yellow inner), and ocean pebbles.

Praying Mantis Stone Mosaic

Praying Mantis Stone Mosaic

Praying Mantis Stone Mosaic

This praying mantis stone mosaic is a small part of a very large mosaic that I’m currently building for the Southside STEM Academy at Campostella in Norfolk, VA. It’s part of a public art project that entails designing and installing six natural stone mosaics in various elementary schools there over the course of the next couple of years.

The eyes of the praying mantis are a fossilized coral called Petoskey stone, while the mantis itself is primarily a native North Carolina stone. Each of these pieces is about 34″ in diameter.

 

Speckled Crab Claw Mosaic

Speckled Crab Claw Stone MosaicCrab Claw Stone Mosaic

This speckled crab claw stone mosaic is a small part of a very large mosaic that I’m currently building for the Southside STEM Academy at Campostella in Norfolk, VA. It’s part of a public art project that entails designing and installing six natural stone mosaics in various elementary schools there over the course of the next couple of years.

The claw itself is made mostly of various marbles from Tennessee.

“The Boy With Antlers” Natural Stone Mosaic in Raleigh Gallery Show

mosaic art

“The Boy With Antlers” Natural stone mosaic including travertine, marble, sandstone, granite. 22″ by 34″ This is a personal piece inspired by a character from the bedtime stories I tell my sons.

“The Boy With Antlers” is a natural stone mosaic I made based on one of the characters from bedtime stories I tell my sons. He is one of four friends possessed of animal traits- an impressive rack of elk antlers, as well as an incredible sense of smell. Of the four friends, he’s the only one who is troubled by his wild nature. I have posted one of the stories I wrote about Bo (his name) that can be downloaded here as a PDF. I also have recorded a couple of stories about the friends and posted them here.

The mosaic is currently on display (from March 4th to April 22) at the Betty Ray McCain Gallery in the Duke Energy Center at 2 East South Street, Raleigh, NC 27601. The mosaic was selected to take part in the 2018 North Carolina Artists Exhibition sponsored by the Raleigh Fine Arts Society. It is an honor to be selected to this juried show of talented North Carolina artists. The piece is for sale as part of the gallery show.

The first cuts of “The Boy With Antlers” are completed.

I worked on this mosaic for over a year, finding time to cut a few stones on the weekends. The face is marble and the antlers are made of travertine.

The Boy With Antlers mosaic being assembled

The mosaic is mounted to a cement backerboard using thinset mortar.

Marc Archambault making a mosaic in the studio.

“The Boy With Antlers” gets delivered to the Raleigh Fine Arts Society show.

I had “The Boy With Antlers” framed once he was accepted into the show. It looks great! The good folks at Frugal Framer knocked it out of the park.

Sand Dollar Mosaic

Sand Dollar Mosaicsand dollar mosaic

This sand dollar mosaic is a small part of a very large mosaic that I’m currently building for the Southside STEM Academy at Campostella in Norfolk, VA. It’s part of a public art project that entails designing and installing six natural stone mosaics in various elementary schools there over the course of the next couple of years.

sand dollar mosaic

This mosaic is made exclusively of Quaker Gray marble from Tennessee Marble Company. Since I used only only one type of stone, I tried to explore texture and profile. The radiating arms of the star design all rise above the plane of the mosaic. This will will be installed at ground level and will encourage kids to touch and interact with the mosaic.

Cicada Mosaic

Cicada MosaicCicada Mosaic

This cicada mosaic is a small part of a very large mosaic that I’m currently building for the Southside STEM Academy at Campostella in Norfolk, VA. It’s part of a public art project that entails designing and installing six natural stone mosaics in various elementary schools there over the course of the next couple of years.

The cicada mosaic is about 33 inches across and will be one of seven circular panels surrounding two kids who are exploring nature with magnifying glasses and sketchbooks. When completed, the mosaic will be applied to a wall in the main hallway just inside the front entrance to the school. The entire mosaic including the cicada panel is called The Tiny Kingdom.

The Boy With Antlers

The Boy With Antlers
The Boy With Antlers

My mosaic entitled “The Boy With Antlers” was recently selected for a the North Carolina Artists Exhibition Opening sponsored by the Raleigh Fine Arts Society. This show specifically showcases artists from all over North Carolina. The piece is 24″ X 36″ and weighs about 55 lbs.

It will be on display at the Betty Ray McCain Gallery at the Duke Center for Performing Arts from March 4, 2018 until April 22, 2018. The juror’s lecture and awards take place on March 8 from 4:00 – 5:00 and will be followed by a wine reception and art sale from 5:00 until 6:30.

Read more about “The Boy With Antlers” as well as other original mosaic art here.

Great Blue Heron Garden Guardian

Great Blue Heron Garden Guardian

The Great Blue Heron Garden Guardian is now installed. The body is made of blue Bahia tile, while the bill is yellow travertine. The legs are made of a marble from Tennessee. The heron is inlayed into a piece of scrap stone from a former project. Read about the stone inlay process of this piece here.

Great Blue Heron Garden Guardian

Garden Guardian in Place

Great Blue Heron Garden Guardian

Prepping for Installation – Photo Credit: Jonathan Frederick

The Great Blue Heron is one of a few Garden Guardian projects we have designed and installed. Explore some of our other Garden Guardian projects here.
Call Marc at (828) 337-7582 or email him to have your own Garden Guardian commissioned.

Stone Inlay Process

Stone Inlay Process – Great Blue Heron

I’ve had this piece of stone at the shop for over a year. It was cut from a bench we installed in the Memorial Garden of First Baptist Church Asheville. I really liked the color and surface texture and was waiting for a project to suggest itself – and along came this blue heron stone inlay. I envisioned it becoming a Garden Guardian like Coyote, a piece we recently designed and installed in Atlanta.

Stone Inlay Process

The drawn pattern of the stone inlay

Soapstone is used to create the lines of the general shape, while a Sharpie is used for the exact contour. (Soapstone blows off when the grinder hits the rock, but the Sharpie stays in place.)

The Cutaway

The heron is a challenging shape. The point of the beak as well as the curve of the neck were both difficult to get just right, so I used pretty much every tool at my disposal. In order to use a small radius blade, I even got a little Dremel tile saw, which was a bit helpful, but overall lacked the needed power. I used a hammer and a very sharp lettering chisel to get the points as crisp as possible.

Stone inlay process

The stone cutaway

The Rubbing

Once the design is cut into the stone, I do a rubbing of sorts to get the contours on paper. I can remember doing this with my mom as a kid in the historic cemeteries of Rhode Island where I’m from. While never as exact as I want it to be, it’s usually pretty close. I drop my shapes onto this and then cut them out.

Stone Inlay Process

The shape rubbed on paper

Design Pattern

As you can see from the countless scribbles, I go through a lot of ideas. (And that’s after having drawn to design before I even started.) What looks good on paper and a small scale might not work in large scale. Due to the complex design of this project, after I cut it I had to reassemble it so I could figure out how the pieces fit together.

Stone Inlay Process

The drawn pattern. Note: nails only there to keep it from blowing away

Starting the Inlay

I knew I wanted the body and wings to be blue Bahia. This is a super expensive tile, but the color is astounding!

Stone Inlay Process

Starting the inlay with blue Bahia tile

The Heron’s Gray Neck

I think the scientist in me got a little too interested in biological accuracy. A great blue heron’s is more gray than blue, and I wanted to reflect that in the inlay. (And yes, I understand that even their wings aren’t that blue!) I switched from the blue Bahia tile to a gray stone for the neck. While I like the gray stone, I didn’t really like the effect.

Stone Inlay Process

The heron’s gray neck

The Finished Product

This is a little more like it. The body, neck, and head are all blue, while the beak is a particularly yellow type of travertine. The crest is black, and the legs are a marble from Tennessee.

Stone inlay process

The finished product

I had to cut the legs twice as the first ones were so snugly fit that a few grains of sand made a wedge between the legs and the stone, making it impossible to get them out without breaking them. I ended up cutting several of the stone of this finished stone inlay more than once.