Backyard Transformation

Backyard Transformation

We are just finishing up this large backyard transformation. We’ve been collaborating with BB Barns on this project. All of the work is laid dry, except there is mortar utilized in the fire pit, to stabilize the refractory brick and to ensure the cap does not move.
There’s at least 30 tons of Tennessee sandstone used in the walls flagstone patio’s in paths and steps. More pictures to come when BB Barns has completed planting and mulching around all of the new stonework.

Backyard Transformation

Stonework Backyard Transformation

Stonework Backyard Transformation

 

Sacred Circle Spring Update

Sacred Circle Farms Spring Update

The homeowners sent me this photo of Sacred Circle Farms in Alexander, NC where we completed the Sacred Fire Circle in January of 2014. We also did the path leading to the front door of their home, and they planted it with phlox. The pinks and purples of the phlox in full bloom really frame the stone path and create a colorful, welcoming entrance.

Stonework Customer Testimonial

Stonework Customer Testimonial

This past winter we completed a stone path and wall for a customer named Tom in North Asheville’s Beaverdam neighborhood. Here is what Tom had to say about our work:

Stonework Customer Testimonial

“Hi Marc. Here is an “in progress” pic for you. It’s a bit messy from the rain. I’m probably half way through planting everything in. My guess is fall will be the time you will want to photograph. It’s really remarkable how much time we spend in the front of the house. We sit on the wall, we sit in the woods… The work you and the team did has way exceeded our expectations. All of it is so well done and done in an extraordinarily perfect way.  We love it. Please pass this on to your team.”
And here is the same area, looking from the opposite direction, before we completed the work:
Stonework Customer Testimonial

Stream Path Stone Mosaic

Stream Path Stone Mosaic

The North Carolina Arboretum commissioned Hammerhead to design and build a stone mosaic in their stream garden. The stream garden is located immediately adjacent to the Arboretum’s signature quilt garden. The Stream Path stone mosaic was fabricated at the shop and installed onsite.

 

For the rapids section of the mosaic, the branches are made of Tennessee sandstone and often correspond with drops in elevation in the stream, to create visual interest and to enhance the sound of the water moving. Kind of like a real branch or log fallen across a stream…

I used a Dremel rotary tool to engrave this mayfly into one of the background stones near the frog in the stream path.

A fun detail of me working under the bridge is that you can see the ‘map’ on the wall. It was a handy reference to have. It shows all the stones and their positions.

Stream Path Stone Mosaic

The map is also pictured here on the level across the stream while Jonathan works.

Process shots from the shop of stone crayfish and the trout chasing minnows.

After fabrication comes transportation. Here is the trout as well as part of the background stacked up in the back of the truck.

Top Ten Stonework Photos

Top Ten Stonework Photos

Photographs are an important part of my stonework. They are essential tools in sharing my work with others. A strong portfolio drives business.

Photographs are part of my process as well. I take pictures throughout a project. Studying them later- that same day, or months on- helps me troubleshoot problems and see where potential lies. They show flaws and places to grow as well as the tiny little details that make all the difference.

Photographs act as my memory. I don’t have any stonework of my own. Much of my work is hidden in backyards and hard to get to. My archives- a disorganized mess of over 20,000 images- help me see what I’ve done. This helps me keep things in perspective; in the depths of winter it’s a nice reminder that the weather will someday break and we can get back to making things.

What follows are my favorite ten images from the first ten years of Hammerhead Stoneworks. These are not the best pictures or the ones that make up the strongest portfolio. These are the photographs that speak to me of the process and the materials and why I love what I do. Click on the titles to read the story behind each of the top ten stonework photos.

John’s Exploded Mosaic

Top Ten Stonework Photos

This might be my favorite image of the last ten years. It’s a memorial mosaic I made, resting in the back of my truck ready to be brought to Riverside Cemetery for installation. There’s something about the exploded, expanded view that I really enjoy. It doesn’t hurt that it’s in the back of my favorite old truck, which now rests dead in the driveway. Residual bright blue spray paint pokes through seams. The name plate at the bottom was carved by me. It’s not at all expertly done done but I was proud of the accomplishment. The family decided to add the dates of John’s birth and death, which wouldn’t fit on this piece. I cut a new stone and had it engraved. I may still have that nameplate somewhere at the shop.

Feathers & Floors

Top Ten Stonework Photos

Twenty years ago Kristin I took an off-season trip to Italy. I had just started stone work and was mesmerized by the craft on display throughout the country. The floors in Venice, especially at Basilica San Marco, were breathtaking and completely changed the way I thought about stone. Their color palettes were bold and clashing, their patterns chaotic and busy, and yet the end result was endlessly fascinating and beautiful. My pursuit of mosaic goes back to the moment I first saw those floors. This small section of the Phoenix Rising mosaic reminds me of those floors. It is a thread- however modest it might be–that connects my humble pursuits to the master craftsman of that bygone age.

Textures

Top Ten Stonework Photos

When I take pictures of my work for my portfolio, I always have to be reminded to show the contacts surrounding the finished piece. Future customers want to see how the wall interacts with the landscape. They want to see how the patio looks with tables and chairs. But I am always drawn to the close-ups, to the images that explore the stone and the stone alone.

This particular image is from my first public art commission”The Blue Spiral” in Gainesville Florida. This shot was taken in the shop during the fabrication process. I love the textures in the tight lines. In this image I saw the potential of the idea being realized.

Frogger

I made a mosaic for the North Carolina Arboretum. It lines the floor of a water feature and includes native species like this bullfrog. As is often the case, my favorite photograph is early in the process, when I recognize that the idea will work. I love the colors here. Most of the stone is regional and in its natural state. The tympanic membrane is a highly polished scrap of marble salvaged from a company that makes countertops.

GreenMan at Rest
Top Ten Stonework Photos

There are so many better pictures of the GreenMan mosaic, Hammerhead’s first large scale wall piece, but this is a favorite. I took this picture at the shop, while we were fabricating. The whole face is there except the eyes, which went through several iterations before I got them right. Even without the eyes, I could tell that this was going to work. This was a crazy time for Hammerhead; GreenMan was built on top of the labyrinth at our shop.

Little Men

Top Ten Stonework Photos

This is a sentimental choice. I don’t love this wall- one of my first- but I do love those little dudes, who are not so little anymore.

Marbles Inlaid

Another shop shot, another moment when a weird idea came together. I had tried prototypes of this idea before, with limited success. Prototypes aren’t supposed to work, I guess. They’re give you the info you need for when you convince a customer to let you build something crazy, like a bench that’s supposed to look like it’s balanced on a bed of marbles.

Alien Landing Pad

Top Ten Stonework Photos

There’s not even any stone in this picture, but I still love it and wanted to include it in the top ten stonework photos. It’s the layout of a hexagonal folly that we built for clients in Biltmore Forest. When we were done, they were married there. I like the vivid colors. I discovered the secret to laying out a hexagon on Wikipedia. It involved aligning the centers of three circles with identical radii. The points where the circles kiss each other become the corners of the hexagon- whose sides will be the same as the radius used. This very simple and practical approach to geometry spurred an ongoing fascination with old school Islamic tile mosaics which are incredibly complex and are designed with only a compass and a straight line.

Labyrinth With Red Leaves

This one soothes me. It’s really the only portfolio-ish shot amongst the top ten stonework photos. It’s been my desktop wallpaper for months now.

Worshop Pegboard

Order is fleeting; chaos always wins. This was taken the day we hung pegboard in the shop. It’s been a mess ever since.

Bonus Image: Hovering Stone

Jonathan Frederick took this shot of me as we were installing 3000 pound chunks of granite at the entrance to the labyrinth. Bodie is running the crane as I escort the big guy to its new home.

Design at Evelyn Place Wins Award

Design at Evelyn Place Wins Award

The Association of Professional Landscape Designers recently awarded a gold award to a project we did in collaboration with Gardens by Mardi. The APLD International Landscape Design Awards Program honors excellence in landscape design. Projects in eight different categories are judged on the basis of difficulty, craftsmanship, attention to detail and execution.

Huge congratulations to Mardi for receiving this award! And big thanks for all the collaborative projects we’ve gotten to create and construct together.

Completed collaboration

Design Detail

Front Before and After

Stone Mosaic “Life Drawing: The Tiny Kingdom”

Stone Mosaic “Life Drawing: The Tiny Kingdom”

Stone Mosaic Life Drawing: The Tiny Kingdom

This piece is called Life Drawing: The Tiny Kingdom. It is a natural stone mosaic that is over 37 feet long and 4 feet tall. Commissioned by the public art department of Norfolk, Virginia, the mosaic is located in the atrium of a new public school, Southside STEM Academy at Campostella.
Part of the design brief was to reflect the school’s status as a STEM environment. I was concerned that any technology I depicted in stone would likely be antiquated in a short time. So I went old school with a magnifying glass and pencil and paper.

Stone Mosaic Life Drawing: The Tiny Kingdom

Stone Mosaic Life Drawing: The Tiny Kingdom
The girl is holding a magnifying glass and studying a moon snail. Immediately behind her there’s a close-up of the spire of the same snail, contained in a circle, as if observed through the magnifying glass. Opposite her, a boy is drawing a cicada wing. Immediately behind him, in another circle, is a cicada. There are eight circles in total, each with a natural element that one might observe and draw exploring nature.

 

Mosaic Exhibitions

2019 Mosaic Arts International Exhibition Series

January 26 – May 19,2019

 

The 18th Annual Mosaic Arts International Exhibition Series, sponsored by the Society of American Mosaic Artists (SAMA), invigorates a new perspective of mosaic art in numerous contexts and celebrates established as well as emerging artists working in the medium today. The selected works reflect the multiplicity of the mosaic medium and its endless applications. The series is comprised of separate juried exhibits featuring the best in contemporary fine art, architectural, community, & site-specific mosaics from SAMA’s diverse international membership.

© 2018 Dave Chance

The Mosaic Arts International: Architectural & Site-Specific segment is a juried exhibit of the best in contemporary architectural and in situ mosaics from SAMA’s diverse international membership. This segment was juried by Kim Emerson, award-winning public artist and founder of the San Diego Mosaic School. The 19 installations selected will be represented at the Nashville Public Library Art Gallery through print and digital images, video, and a collection of ephemera provided by the artists. Materials on display will include drawings, sketchbooks, materials samples, and tools that will provide visitors a unique perspective into the process of creating a large-scale mosaic work. The exhibition features the works of 19 artists from Canada, Australia, Brazil, and the United States, including Marc Archambault of Asheville, North Carolina.

Phoenix Rising: Photographs of the Finished Piece

Completed Stone Mosaic: Phoenix Rising

Huge thanks to photographer Dave Chance for getting these excellent photographs of the recently completed stone mosaic in a school in Norfolk, VA. Phoenix Rising is part of a series of six mosaics Hammerhead is making for schools in this area as part of a public art commission. You can peruse Dave’s portfolio here.

© 2018 Dave Chance

 

Completed Phoenix Stone Mosaic

© 2018 Dave Chance

Completed Phoenix Stone Mosaic

Head of the Phoenix © 2018 Dave Chance

Stone pattern © 2018 Dave Chance