Daggett Mountain Stone Walls

A view of the whole area. We didn’t do the koi pond.


Last week we finished this project on Sunset Mountain in Asheville. We built two small patios of Tennessee Crab Orchard stone, a gray sandstone from Tennessee. There’s a long low fire pit. And plenty of wall.

A low fire pit framed by pieces of Hooper’s Creek


The walls are made of a local stone that comes from Daggett Mountain. It’s a fun material, lending itself to interesting fits and the opportunity to work a bit more freely, less reliant on the level. It can be challenging for the same reasons. It’s a hard stone to get in good supply. Everyone has it, but the supply is very junky, at least for the types of walls we like to build. Buying it in bulk or even on pallets, half of the stone we would get- if not more- would be wasted. So we go and pick every piece individually from stone yard piles around town.

A mortared wall of Daggett Mountain Stone


There is a freestanding wall that separates the driveway from the patio. That wall is mortared. There is also a retaining wall that leans against the bank, where the fire pit is nestled. That wall is laid dry.

Three walls meet at this boulder (there’s another drystone wall on the opposite side.)


The two walls intersect at a boulder, that was already on site, but needed to be relocated. 

A patio of sandstone from Tennessee, sometimes called Crab Orchard, is framed by Daggett Mountain Stone walls


In this picture you might notice that the patio is two toned. In the foreground is an existing murdered walkway but the owner didn’t care to replace. We took out a couple of stones so that our new patio could be connected to that walkway. As the stone weathers it will blend together better.