Stone Inlay Techniques on Asheville School Crest Medallion

This is the site of our current project, a gathering space at Asheville School. The school crest will be located in the center of the patio.


Our current project has us building a gathering space at Asheville School. The patio will be the centerpiece of the Bement Garden. We are collaborating with Mardi Letson of Gardens By Mardi on this project.

The medallion is five feet across. The Sharpie lines indicate the inlay locations.


We are building a stone medallion that depicts the school’s crest for the center of the patio. There are symbols throughout the crest that will be inlaid into the patio stone. Some are fairly straightfoward- others are quite tricky.

The most challenging part of doing inlay in stone is removing the material where the inlay is supposed to go. The following video walks through the process and the tools I use.

Grinder lines cut into stone for major stock removal.


I used both of the grinders in the video to create the outer border of the design and cut a cross hatch pattern into the stone. This allows for easier stock removal.

Hand hammer and chisel to remove the vast majority of the stone. Must be careful to not damage edges doing this.


Hand hammer and chisel were used to get out the vast majority of the stock. This is very effective in wide open areas- like the center- but not wise near the edges or in tight spaces.

I’ve removed what I could by hand chisel and grinder. Ready to tackle it with the pneumatic chisel.


I use a pneumatic chisel- made by Trow and Holden Company of Barre, Vermont- to work close to the edges. This is not necessarily a delicate tool- it’s really just a mini jackhammer- but it is more efficient than doing it by hand. I can regulate the air flow to control the strength of the chisel blows. Really though, the key is in the angle of attack. Work away from the edges of the design and away from the top of the stone.

The tree pattern space after finishing up with the pneumatic chisel.

I try to take out a half an inch of stock when doing an inlay.

I try to take out about a half inch of depth. This allows room for a stone tile- generally 3/8″ thick- and a bed of thinset tile mortar.

A mosaic tree inlay in a piece of bluestone


It fits! Some detail work on the mosaic and it’s ready for thinset. A bunch more to do!