Pink Granite and Impulse Buys

Close up of a drystone wall made from salvaged pink granite.

I have a small problem with purchasing things that I don’t truly need. I have been fortunate that this impulse control problem has been localized to two things: I buy books and I buy stone. (It is worth noting that often the books I buy are about stone.)
I have managed to curb my book buying urge. Three years ago we moved. It was intended that we would be moving again in about two months, so we put a bunch of stuff, including all my books, in storage. Three years later my book collection still resides in storage. I have a rule that I can’t add to the library until I have a library.
My impulse is to buy stones have been harder to manage. It will happen in the gem and mineral stores that are scattered around Asheville. I find colors and textures and fossils that just absolutely belong in a mosaic somewhere someday somehow. I got to get them. Happily these purchases are usually small and often do find their way into mosaics as eyes or small colorful details in a larger piece.
My stone impulsivity also arises as I walk the margins of the many stone yards where I shop for my project materials. I just find cool, weird pieces that have latent potential. I have trouble walking by…
One time for reasons that remain unclear to me I was compelled to buy several tons of pink granite. No, it wasn’t especially cheap. No, I had no immediate or projected need for it. I just thought it was uncommon and cool and so I bought it. It ended up hanging around taking up space at the for a really long time.
A recent customer owns a house built in the 1920s that was made of the same pink granite. At long last, a use for this stone. We built them a retaining wall that connects part of the original house to an addition. The house is mortared of course, but the wall is dry stone. Many of the pieces of granite I had were enormous four feet by five feet and 10 inches thick. You will see drill holes in the face of the wall from the feathers and wedges. There are similar drill holes throughout the granite on the house as well.

A drystone pink granite wall in front of a mortared pink granite house.

My brothers and sisters of stone craft will notice more long vertical joints that are customary in a Hammerhead wall. This is a byproduct of having only three thicknesses of stone to work with. All of our source material was either 4 3/8” thick or 8 1/4” thick or 10” thick. It was a real puzzle to align these dimensions in a pleasing and structurally sounds way. Luckily we had some pink Tennessee marble that we could mix in. It was about 3/4” thick but it helped. We rarely work with granite. It’s a hard material but it has such a lovely and predictable grain that it was easy to chisel compared to our local stone.
And I cleared some space in the yard for my next random purchase!