Mosaic

A detail of "The Boy With Antlers" mosaic.

A detail of “The Boy With Antlers” mosaic showing the travertine antlers and sandstone (mostly) background.

“The Boy With Antlers” is all natural stone, much of regional and scrounged from scrap piles. I favor recycling, but find the real joy of scrounging to me is finding treasures, like the travertine tile that became the antlers, found in a scrap bin at a local tile shop. This character is drawn from the stories I tell my boys at bedtime. The mosaic is inspired in equal measure by the old school Italian art of pietre dure and Japanese manga.

Mountain Sunset Mosaic

Mountain Sunset Mosaic

Recently installed at the Memorial Garden at the First Baptist Church of Asheville, the “Mountain Waterfall” could best be described as a mosaic veneer. The whole thick is about 4″ thick, which is a standard depth for the stone facades thrown up on ‘upscale’ houses around Asheville. Hammerhead doesn’t typically build veneers, but we enjoyed the challenge of creating this super thick mosaic. See more images here.

The full size mosaic in the space.

The full size mosaic in the space. Photograph ©2016 David Dietrich

One of Hammerhead’s most ambitious projects, the GreenMan mosaic is sixteen feet wide and twenty feet tall. Learn more about it here.

Frankie on her sunflower mosaic patio

Frankie on her sunflower mosaic patio

I like to call this style of mosaic a stone rug. This was my first- and only so far- doggy patio.

Stone and tile shower mosaic

Stone and tile shower mosaic

Close up one of the mosaic fish.

Close up one of the mosaic fish, made of absolute black granite tile.

This is a more traditional mosaic style- a mixture of store bought glass and ceramic tile- and natural stone. I designed the fish so that each one could be cut from a single 12″ by 12″ tile. I beleive that each is cut from a different type of stone. It’s also a more traditional site for a mosaic- the shower stall at a friend’s house.

Flight

Flight

My first wall hanging mosaic, “Flight” is the thickness of standard tile. That was the big evolution, using stone tiles as well as the scraps of stone scrounged from our typical stonework projects, in this case the bluestone background. At this point I am really starting to love the contrast between polished and honed tiles and the riven surfaces of quarried stone.

The Sultan

The Sultan

The Sultan was the first image I did in stone and I still like it. I recall seeing it emerge on the workshop bench and thinking, “This could be cool…”

Egg

Egg

My first ever attempt at natural stone mosaic. The stones were 1.5″ thick and even these simple shapes were painstaking to cut. If I recall, I did all the curves by kerfing- a very time-consuming and cautious way to go about it. Oh, and the egg’s not stone after all, but a manufactured kitchen counter product I scrounged from somewhere.