Entrance Sign for the Town of Weaverville, NC

Weaverville Entrance Sign

Weaverville Entrance Sign

The Weaverville entrance sign, designed and built for the town of Weaverville, NC, features a moongate, or complete circular arch. The sign greets visitors arriving into Weaverville as they pass Lake Louise, onto which the moongate opens. The complexity of this build revealed sandstone as the ideal choice because it is colorful and easy to work.

This moongate design element, complete with 3 intersecting slabs of sandstone at the bottom, is inspired by a fiddlehead fern. One of the sure signs of spring, fiddlehead ferns represent growth and renewal, speaking to some of Weaverville’s lovely qualities. The moongate itself also references a nearby water wheel, located just below Lake Louise. While no longer functional, the water wheel serves as a bit of a local landmark, and it is a unique place to check out.

Weaverville Entrance Sign

Closeup of the moongate

Weaverville Sign Process

Weaverville Entrance Sign

Initial sign sketch

Weaverville Entrance Sign

Laying out the stones for the moongate

Weaverville Entrance Sign

Finished product

Read More About Stone Signs by Hammerhead Stoneworks

Sacred Fire Circle in Alexander, NC

Sacred Fire Circle in Alexander, NC

Sacred Fire Circle Panorama

Sacred Fire Circle

Hammerhead completed the fire circle in January of 2014 for clients hoping to use the space for ceremonial gatherings.
Rays of black granite shoot out from the central fire ring in the cardinal directions until they meet the four large site boulders. Each site boulder frames one side of the four semicircular stone benches that border the circle. Reclaimed granite of various colors and patterns give each planet orbiting around the fire ring its own distinct look.

Click here for the process of creating this unique project, and click the image above for a huge view!

The planets in orbit around the sacred fire circle

The planets in orbit around the fire circle

Hammerhead Stoneworks Featured in Asheville Lifestyle Magazine

Following up Hammerhead’s recent feature in the Slippery Rock Gazette, Asheville Lifestyle magazine’s September 2016 issue features our Green Man mosaic as well as other projects. We completed the Green Man Mosaic for Green Man Brewing in downtown Asheville, NC. The mosaic greets brewery visitors immediately upon entry to the building.

The full size mosaic in the space as featured in Asheville Lifestyle magazine

The full size mosaic in the space as featured in Asheville Lifestyle magazine ©2016 David Dietrich

The article describes in detail the process of designing and creating the Green Man mosaic. It covers Marc’s attention to detail and quality, it elaborates on the local materials used for the project, and it gives an introduction to the full Hammerhead crew. The feature also includes a glimpse into one of Marc’s personal pieces entitled The Boy With Antlers (pictured below).

"The Boy With Antlers" is a natural stone mosaic.

“The Boy With Antlers” is a natural stone mosaic

Read the full feature in Asheville Lifestyle magazine here.

 

In the mosaic workspace

In the mosaic workspace

 

Contributors to the Asheville Lifestyle Magazine Feature

We would like to extend our gratitude to Tom Rogers for authoring this piece as well as to David Dietrich, Emily Glaser, and Kristin Cozzolino for their photo contributions.

 

Hammerhead Stoneworks Featured in the Slippery Rock Gazette

The Slippery Rock Gazette recently featured Hammerhead’s Green Man mosaic completed for Green Man Brewery. The article explains in great detail the process of creating the mosaic from the imagineering phase to the finished product. Additionally, readers can learn about why certain stones were selected as well as what a project of this scale entails.

Access the full feature here.

Special Thanks for the Slippery Rock Gazette Feature

We extend our gratitude to Peter J. Marcucci for authoring this feature as well as to Braxton-Bragg, who both publishes the Gazette and regularly supplies Hammerhead Stoneworks with cool tools and cutting supplies.

The full size mosaic in the space as featured in the Slippery Rock Gazette

The full size mosaic in the space Photograph ©2016 David Dietrich

The Mountain Waterfall Mosaic

The Mountain Waterfall Mosaic is located at First Baptist Church of Asheville, and it was the last part of the Memorial Garden that we completed there. The waterfall was a collaborative effort between Hammerhead and the crew at Medallion Pools led by Mark Dorsey. While Mark and crew took charge of the waterwork elements of the waterfall, Hammerhead was charged with designing and installing the stone.

Details About the Mountain Waterfall Mosaic

The waterfall is located at the end of the stream path. In fact, the bluestone that runs throughout the stream path represents the flowing water and widens as it reaches the pool. The floor of the pool is completely done in the bluestone as well. The sky in the waterfall mosaic is also bluestone, and I like the implied metaphor here. These elements were key components of the design created by Steve Wyda and Ryan Blau of Vision Design Collaborative, the landscape architects who designed the Memorial Garden.

Stream Path Leading to Waterfall

Stream Path Leading to Waterfall

The spillway is made of mountain stone, while the sun and sunset clouds are made of Tennessee sandstone. The Tennessee sandstone is used throughout the entire project at First Baptist Church of Asheville, including in the stream path, the labyrinth itself, and several of the benches. The mountains are made of a native stone that is sometimes called Emerald Gray. We were able to source it from Marion, NC, a town about an hour east of Asheville.

Mountain Waterfall Mosaic

Mountain Waterfall Mosaic

Our Thoughts About this Project

The waterfall was a very challenging build. It wasn’t one project but rather ten small projects combined, each with its own specific components. And when it was done and the water was flowing for the first time, it immediately became my favorite. The sound of the water washed away the months of stress of getting the whole garden finished.

Our completed waterfall flowing

Our completed waterfall flowing

At Hammerhead, it’s the challenges of the project that get us excited. We will take on almost any project, but we do have a couple of rules: no veneer and no water features. Of course, we broke both of these rules for the waterfall. The mosaic background – the mountains and the sunset – is a cut stone approach to veneer. It’s 4 inches thick, basically the depth of the brick, and is affixed to a block wall coated in shotcrete. I am proud to say, it doesn’t look like any lick’em-stick’em I’ve ever seen.

I try to avoid the naturalistic water features that are so commonplace now. Making mountain streams is Mother Nature’s domain, not mine. But this waterfall had just the right balance of creative freedom in the design, execution, and technical challenges to keep us all engaged and excited about the outcome. It’s my favorite project – for now…

Our completed waterfall flowing

Our completed waterfall flowing

Garden Stonework in Mardi’s Yard

Over the last several years Hammerhead Stoneworks has worked closely with garden designer Mardi Letson, owner of Gardens by Mardi. The images below are from garden stonework projects we’ve done in her own yard. Mardi has a wonderful sense of design and can integrate plants into stonework wonderfully. She’s very talented and very easy to work with. She is especially good at working with small spaces as is demonstrated in her own yard. Her yard is not huge by any means, but it has so many little rooms and small special places to hang out.

The Finished Garden Stonework Products

garden stonework

Dry Stone Wall in Mardi’s yard

 

Stone slab steps at Mardi's

Stone slab steps at Mardi’s

 

Dry-laid flagstone path

Dry-laid flagstone path featuring the heart-shaped rock Mardi requested

Modern stack bench – First Baptist Church of Asheville

At Hammerhead, we enjoy the challenge of creating new designs for stone benches. We seek a balance between bombproof structure and graceful aesthetics, and we like our benches to be whimsical. The labyrinth project we competed for First Baptist Church of Asheville is comprised of four of our bench designs, including our modern stack bench.

The columbarium area of the Memorial Garden at First Baptist Church of Asheville contains four modern stack benches. The benches have a very clean, modern aesthetic. The design committee requested something more formal while not overtly like a highly polished memorial bench found in a graveyard.

Materials Used for the Modern Stack Bench

A rough hewn granite block anchors the bench to the concrete. Pennsylvania Bluestone comprises the seats, topped with reclaimed black granite. The granite serves as a spacer, which creates a shadow that suggests that the big blue slab is floating over the granite.

All of the materials used for the benches figure heavily in the overall design of the garden. We wanted the benches to help unite the various elements of the design. The black granite used in the benches resembles the granite used for the columbarium vaults as the place where names will be engraved. This provides a unifying element with other areas of the Memorial Garden.

Modern Stack Bench at First Baptist Church of Asheville

Modern Stack Bench at First Baptist Church of Asheville

Floating Stone Bench at First Baptist Church of Asheville

The Floating Stone Bench

At Hammerhead, we enjoy the challenge of creating new designs for stone benches. We seek a balance between bombproof structure and graceful aesthetics. And we like them to be whimsical. The floating stone bench is one of four designs we created for the memorial garden at First Baptist Church of Asheville for, as we call it, the labyrinth project.

One of our favorite designs, the floating bench is truly one of a kind as we created specifically for the church. A steel armature levitates a slab of bluestone above a block of Tennessee sandstone.

Floating stone bench at First Baptist Church of Asheville

Floating bench at First Baptist Church of Asheville

Read More About Benches by Hammerhead Stoneworks

Boulder Bench – First Baptist Church of Asheville

The Boulder Bench

At Hammerhead, we enjoy the challenge of creating new designs for stone benches. We seek a balance between bombproof structure and graceful aesthetics, and we like them to be whimsical. We created four bench designs for the memorial garden at First Baptist Church of Asheville for the labyrinth project. The boulder bench is one of these designs.

There are four boulder benches spaced around the labyrinth at First Baptist Church of Asheville. The benches are drawn from Hammerhead’s traditional design of a boulder bench, which is a large slab of sandstone seated on top of a pair of funky sandstone boulders. At First Baptist Church of Asheville, we cut the tops of the benches to have the precise radius of the outside edge of the labyrinth in order to provide visual continuity with the radiating circles of the labyrinth.

One boulder bench at First Baptist Church of Asheville

One of four boulder benches at First Baptist Church of Asheville

Read More About Benches by Hammerhead Stoneworks

Stone Bench: The Harmony Design

Hammerhead Stoneworks designs and installs innovative natural stone benches.

Harmony Stone Bench

Stone benches are wonderful addition to outdoor spaces and a unique design opportunity. At Hammerhead, we enjoy the challenge of creating new designs for stone benches. We seek a balance between bombproof structure and graceful aesthetics. And we like them to be whimsical. The harmony stone bench is one of four designs we created for the memorial garden at First Baptist Church of Asheville for, as we call it, the labyrinth project. This is a favorite design of mine, because of how delicate they appear and how strong they truly are. There’s something a bit magical about that to me!

We created two of these harmony stone benches for the memorial garden, and both are made of river rock and a blue stone slab with a hidden steel armature supporting the overall structure. The waterworn pebbles and crisply cut top add an eclectic juxtaposition. These benches are adjacent to the water feature Hammerhead is currently constructing in the labyrinth. River pebbles echo the flowing water and river path that leads to the feature. The blue slab of the bench ties to the stream path that leads to the feature. One feels connected to the water and its movement in the space. The delicate balancing act is deceptive; these benches are super sturdy!

Harmony stone bench at First Baptist Church of Asheville by Hammerhead Stoneworks

Harmony stone bench at First Baptist Church of Asheville by Hammerhead Stoneworks

Harmony stone bench at First Baptist Church of Asheville by Hammerhead Stoneworks

 

Read More About Benches by Hammerhead Stoneworks