Atlanta Art Projects

 

Atlanta Art Projects

These two pieces were created for clients in Atlanta, GA. “Coyote” is what I call a garden guardian. It is a freestanding garden sculpture set in concrete below grade. The coyote itself is made of a polished black marble that was inlaid into a slab of Tennessee sandstone. While labor-intensive to produce, the results are worth it.

The dendrite stone screen, or framed picture stone, features a beautiful dendrite pattern in a slab of 2′ by 3′. Despite their appearance, dendrites aren’t actually fossils of a fern or other plant but result from mineral intrusion into the stone.
We designed the frame and had a friend fabricate it for us. The frame secures the stone without requiring any drill holes or epoxy. For installation, the frame is bolted to a subterranean concrete slab.

Pennsylvania Stone Steps & Patio

Pennsylvania Stone Steps & Patio Hammerhead Stoneworks Asheville, NC

Pennsylvania Stone Steps & Patio

We completed this set of steps as well as a patio for a home in North Asheville. Made of Pennsylvania stone, a short stack of steps leads up from the driveway to a stepping stone path. The patio is built over an old concrete slab, which isn’t always possible, but we had the clearances necessary to get our stone and setting bed in place. Leaving the slab in place instead of removing it saved the customer a considerable amount of money.

While the steps and patio were laid dry, the flagstone on the stoop was mortared in place for supplemental support.

 

Big Stone Patio

big stone patio Hammerhead Stoneworks Asheville, NC
Big Stone Patio

The patio is what we call big stone paving, and it is one of Hammerhead’s signature styles. It is made of sandstone slabs (also used here) about two inches thick and also connects to a pair of boulders found on the property.

big stone patio Hammerhead Stoneworks Asheville, NC
As a preventive measure to protect the look of the patio from grease drippings, we ensured that the grill is set in a small gravel area next to the patio.

big stone patio Hammerhead Stoneworks Asheville, NC
The shape of the patio is very free-flowing and truly complements the both the modern design and color scheme of the house.

big stone patio Hammerhead Stoneworks Asheville, NC

Frog Mosaic at North Carolina Arboretum

Frog Mosaic at NC Arboretum Hammerhead Stoneworks
Frog Mosaic at NC Arboretum

The North Carolina Arboretum commissioned Hammerhead to design and build a stone mosaic in their stream garden. The stream garden is located immediately adjacent to the Arboretum’s signature quilt garden.

Frog Mosaic at North Carolina Arboretum Hammerhead Stoneworks

The frog mosaic lines the bottom of a long, man-made water feature and references to two large bullfrogs living in the water feature. Often times they hang out in the storage tank which houses the water pump. The arboretum staff as well as the many school groups led through the garden know the frogs well. Known as ‘Hamburger’ and ‘French Fry,’ the beloved bullfrogs often made their kerlunking sounds as we worked nearby.

While most of the stone is regional, the tympanic membrane is a scrap of countertop material. The eye is a Mexican beach pebble.

Frog Mosaic North Carolina Arboretum Hammerhead Stoneworks

Sacred Fire Circle Update

Here are some new photographs of the sacred fire circle that Hammerhead completed in January 2014 for clients in Alexander, NC. Over 3 1/2 years later, the space is still well-used and can be viewed from outer space!

sacred fire circle hammerhead stoneworks

The overall design of the Sacred Fire Circle

 

Google Earth image of the prepped site before we began construction. The little white squares are the first pallets of stone.

 

A Google Earth image of the Sacred Fire Circle

Unique Drain Design

drain Hammerhead Stoneworks

(Above) The drain with the lid in place (Below) A closeup of the drain design and detail.

We incorporated this drain design in a patio we installed to cover and protect a sewer cleanout. The lid is the same type of stone used to build the patio. We used spray foam to create a seal to prevent gravel under the patio from making its way into the drain.

Lakeshore Bench

Lakeshore Bench

lakeshore bench hammerhead stoneworks
This backyard bench was designed and installed in North Asheville’s Lakeshore neighborhood. It is featured in the yard of a very avid gardener. It is a mortared bench that curves to round off the corners of the yard.

All the stone used for this bench is local with the end caps and wall portion made of mountain field stone and the seat made of Hooper’s Creek, which is quarried in Fletcher, NC. (We often use Hooper’s Creek as featured here.)

lakeshore bench hammerhead stoneworks

Hammerhead Stoneworks Featured in the Slippery Rock Gazette

The Slippery Rock Gazette recently featured Hammerhead’s Green Man mosaic completed for Green Man Brewery. The article explains in great detail the process of creating the mosaic from the imagineering phase to the finished product. Additionally, readers can learn about why certain stones were selected as well as what a project of this scale entails.

Access the full feature here.

Special Thanks for the Slippery Rock Gazette Feature

We extend our gratitude to Peter J. Marcucci for authoring this feature as well as to Braxton-Bragg, who both publishes the Gazette and regularly supplies Hammerhead Stoneworks with cool tools and cutting supplies.

The full size mosaic in the space as featured in the Slippery Rock Gazette

The full size mosaic in the space Photograph ©2016 David Dietrich

The Mountain Waterfall Mosaic

The Mountain Waterfall Mosaic is located at First Baptist Church of Asheville, and it was the last part of the Memorial Garden that we completed there. The waterfall was a collaborative effort between Hammerhead and the crew at Medallion Pools led by Mark Dorsey. While Mark and crew took charge of the waterwork elements of the waterfall, Hammerhead was charged with designing and installing the stone.

Details About the Mountain Waterfall Mosaic

The waterfall is located at the end of the stream path. In fact, the bluestone that runs throughout the stream path represents the flowing water and widens as it reaches the pool. The floor of the pool is completely done in the bluestone as well. The sky in the waterfall mosaic is also bluestone, and I like the implied metaphor here. These elements were key components of the design created by Steve Wyda and Ryan Blau of Vision Design Collaborative, the landscape architects who designed the Memorial Garden.

Stream Path Leading to Waterfall

Stream Path Leading to Waterfall

The spillway is made of mountain stone, while the sun and sunset clouds are made of Tennessee sandstone. The Tennessee sandstone is used throughout the entire project at First Baptist Church of Asheville, including in the stream path, the labyrinth itself, and several of the benches. The mountains are made of a native stone that is sometimes called Emerald Gray. We were able to source it from Marion, NC, a town about an hour east of Asheville.

Mountain Waterfall Mosaic

Mountain Waterfall Mosaic

Our Thoughts About this Project

The waterfall was a very challenging build. It wasn’t one project but rather ten small projects combined, each with its own specific components. And when it was done and the water was flowing for the first time, it immediately became my favorite. The sound of the water washed away the months of stress of getting the whole garden finished.

Our completed waterfall flowing

Our completed waterfall flowing

At Hammerhead, it’s the challenges of the project that get us excited. We will take on almost any project, but we do have a couple of rules: no veneer and no water features. Of course, we broke both of these rules for the waterfall. The mosaic background – the mountains and the sunset – is a cut stone approach to veneer. It’s 4 inches thick, basically the depth of the brick, and is affixed to a block wall coated in shotcrete. I am proud to say, it doesn’t look like any lick’em-stick’em I’ve ever seen.

I try to avoid the naturalistic water features that are so commonplace now. Making mountain streams is Mother Nature’s domain, not mine. But this waterfall had just the right balance of creative freedom in the design, execution, and technical challenges to keep us all engaged and excited about the outcome. It’s my favorite project – for now…

Our completed waterfall flowing

Our completed waterfall flowing

Modern stack bench – First Baptist Church of Asheville

At Hammerhead, we enjoy the challenge of creating new designs for stone benches. We seek a balance between bombproof structure and graceful aesthetics, and we like our benches to be whimsical. The labyrinth project we competed for First Baptist Church of Asheville is comprised of four of our bench designs, including our modern stack bench.

The columbarium area of the Memorial Garden at First Baptist Church of Asheville contains four modern stack benches. The benches have a very clean, modern aesthetic. The design committee requested something more formal while not overtly like a highly polished memorial bench found in a graveyard.

Materials Used for the Modern Stack Bench

A rough hewn granite block anchors the bench to the concrete. Pennsylvania Bluestone comprises the seats, topped with reclaimed black granite. The granite serves as a spacer, which creates a shadow that suggests that the big blue slab is floating over the granite.

All of the materials used for the benches figure heavily in the overall design of the garden. We wanted the benches to help unite the various elements of the design. The black granite used in the benches resembles the granite used for the columbarium vaults as the place where names will be engraved. This provides a unifying element with other areas of the Memorial Garden.

Modern Stack Bench at First Baptist Church of Asheville

Modern Stack Bench at First Baptist Church of Asheville